Home

Kids

Who

What

When

Where

How

Why

Links

Contact




(The research presented here in the following timeline is consistently undergoing revision and editing, and we greatly appreciate any additions and, or corrections to our ongoing efforts.)


So who is part of our family tree timeline?


The Sumerians, Egyptians & East Indians

These ancient B.C. civilizations of the world were crowned with almost all the known “firsts” in human understanding of the natural and man made worlds. They all had some type of synesthetic correlation system and or knowledge of the connection between MUSIC and COLOR. Being that as it may, this knowledge is mostly fragmented and rather elusive, do to the nature of these very ancient records, most of which are on clay tablets.

The Chinese

In ancient China B.C., one of the many schemes relating matters such as the seasons, body parts, facial features and planets, contained the following relationships between musical tones and colors:

Tone

Color

Black

jué

Green-Blue

zhiv

Red

go-ng

Yellow

sha-ng

White

The Persians

In ancient Persia B.C., an old scheme provided the following system of correspondences between musical notes and colors:

Note

Color

B

Rose

A

Green

G

Bright Blue

F

Black

E

Yellow

D

Violet

C

Blue-Black

The Greeks

Around the year 550 B.C., Pythagoras presented mathematical equations for musical scales, showing that musical notes could be seen as relationships between numbers.  A musical scale, for example, would be divided into eight notes, or an "Octave" scale, which would repeat its sequence as notes proceeded up and down the scale.  To use the simplest example, this could be the C Major scale, which consist of the seven so-called “natural” notes: C, D, E, F, G, A, B & C.

Around 370 B.C., Plato wrote Timaeus, in which he described the “Soul of the World” as having these same musical ratios. A cosmology soon evolved in which the known planets' radii were given a ratio sequence of 1:2:3:4:8:9. This sequence came close to the Greek diatonic musical scale's ratios and so the known planets were linked to music. Plato pondered the idea of eight concentric circles, each with its own color and tone. The eighth note was a repetition of the first note and all the notes sounding together produced what he called the "Music of the Spheres".

Around 350 B.C., Aristotle wrote to support that the harmony of colors were like the harmony of sounds.  As Aristotle's works began to be translated and incorporated into the European sciences, this led to the eventual relating of specific sound and light frequencies. He suggested one of the first
MUSIC/COLOR formulas. He had no concept of the natural color spectrum so he arbitrarily chose Black (which is actually not a color but theoretically the absence of color) and White (which is actually not a color either but theoretically the presence of all colors) at the ends and several known colors in the middle. Aristotle also assigned colors to musical tones according to how these tones and colors mixed together:

Interval

Color

Double-Octave

Black

Twelfth

Violet

Eleventh 

Blue

Octave

Green

Fifth

Red

Fourth

Yellow

Base

White

At about this same time, Archytas of Tarentus introduced the idea of the "Chromatic" scale to Greece, adding five half tones to the existing seven “natural” tones.  This idea was eventually seen as a compliment to the two main types of seven natural tone scales at that time; these being primarily the major and minor modes of natural note scales, which later lead to the Church Modes. The five new half tones, termed chromatic notes (which was a term used to describe both music and color), were seen as having a mixture or combination of the music and color elements of both natural notes directly above and below each half note. This later became known as “enharmonic spelling”.

During the time between 350 B.C. and 1000 A.D., the pre-age scientific knowledge, handed down by these great philosophers, had survived mainly due to knowledge recorded and handed down by Socrates, his scribes, his successors and other like minded individuals. A brief overview of this knowledge, as it has evolved through the science of numerology, and music theory in general, is as follows:

If we hypothetically take three numbers, which we can call 1, 2, and 3, and we observe that the absolute number of different combinations of these three numbers is seven combinations, the following numerical chart becomes true:

Combination 1

1, 2 & 3 or 2, 3 & 1 or 3, 1 & 2 etc.

Combination 2

1

Combination 3

1 & 2 or 2 & 1

Combination 4

2

Combination 5

2 & 3 or 3 & 2

Combination 6

3

Combination 7

3 & 1 or 1 & 3

One way the connection between COLOR and the above chart can be seen, is in the fact that there are three primary colors in the color spectrum, plus four more secondary colors that are created from the combinations of the three primary colors. These seven natural colors are either one of the primary colors, or a resultant mixture of two or three of the primary colors. Notice that the primary colors cannot be created by mixing any other colors, so they are quite unique. The three primary colors are Red, Yellow, and Blue while the secondary colors are Brown, Orange, Green and Violet; these being the four colors that are created by mixing, in equal portions, the three primary colors according to the chart provided bellow:

Color

Number

Primary Colors

Brown

1, 2 & 3

Red, Yellow & Blue

Red

1

Red

Orange

1 & 2

Red & Yellow

Yellow

2

Yellow

Green

2 & 3

Yellow & Blue

Blue

3

Blue

Violet

3 & 1

Blue & Red

We can see that theoretically, COLOR can be based on the relationships between the numbers three and seven. Likewise, there are also three primary tones in MUSIC and four secondary tones, all known as the seven “natural” notes in music. The four secondary notes are the harmonic resolution of the synthesis, or simultaneous occurrence, of the combination of two or three of the primary notes.

Note Resolution

Number

Primary Note Synthesis

B

1, 2 & 3

C, E & G resolve up to B

C (resolves to itself)

1

C

D

1 & 2

C & E resolve in to D

E (resolves to itself)

2

E

F

2 & 3

E & G resolve in to F

G (resolves to itself)

3

G

A

3 & 1

G & C resolve down to A

The three notes that correspond to the primary colors can be seen as C, E & G (a Major triad), which is the most important chord in music and the groundwork for the major scale occurring within the natural phenomena known as the “Harmonic Series”. It is important to realize that these correspondences, between the colors of the spectrum and the notes of the musical scale (being based on the same principals of nature), have been adapted in some form or another by most cultures worldwide and can be seen as being coded with any type of color configuration.

The scientific knowledge of this time was given to understanding the nature of the five remaining half tones, which lay between
C and D, D and E, F and G, G and A and A and B, as wavelength nodes, or half way marks, in a twelve tone system of equal proportions. Relating the natural notes to the known colors was of coarse, a natural thing to do; and as stated earlier, the five half notes were understood to contain elements of both natural notes directly above and below each half note. This later became known as “enharmonic spelling”, such as the half note between notes C and D having the two names of C sharp or D flat; and in this case, also a double color relationship which we, here at MUSICAL COLORS, have termed “enharmonic coloring” (EC).

Rudolph

Sometime around 1075 A.D., Rudolph of Saint Trond introduced a colored note system which represented the Greek modes of plainsong:

Mode

Color

Dorian

Red

Phrygian

Green

Lydian

Yellow

Mixolydian

Violet

Gaffurio

Around 1492, Franchino Gaffurio reintroduced colorized modal music in Europe, with the following color relationships to plainsong:

Mode

Color

Dorian

Crystalline

Phrygian

Orange

Lydian

Red

Mixolydian

Undefined Mixed Color

Cardanus

In 1570, Girolamo Cardanus developed a system of corresponding tone intervals with, among many other things, colors:

Interval

Color

Octave

White

Major Sixth

Green

Minor Sixth

Violet

Fifth

Yellow

Fourth

Blue

Major Third

Black

Minor Third

Red

Kirchner

Around the year 1646, Athanasius Kirchner developed a system of correspondences between musical intervals and colors as follows:

Interval

Color

Octave

Green

Seventh

Blue-Violet

Major Sixth

Fire Red

Minor Sixth

Red-Violet

Augmented Fifth

Dark Brown

Fifth

Gold

Diminished Fifth

Blue

Fourth

Brown-Yellow

Major Third

Bright Red

Minor Third

Gold

Major Second

Black

Minor Second

White

Cureau

Marin Cureau de la Chambre, in 1650, proposed a simple scheme of colored musical intervals based on Aristotle’s version:

Interval

Color

Double-Octave

Black

Twelfth

Violet

Eleventh

Blue

Octave

Green

Fifth

Red

Fourth

Yellow

Base

White

Newton

In 1704 Sir Isaac Newton's treatise Optics was first published, which partially dealt with the correlation between colors of the spectrum and notes of the musical scale.  Newton mathematically, but quite arbitrarily, divided the visible light spectrum into seven colors (six known colors and one new color, which he named “Indigo”):
Red, Orange, Yellow, Green, Blue, Indigo and Violet. One should understand that Newton’s Blue is really the intermediate shade between Green and the “true” Blue (i.e. Green-Blue), and his Indigo is really just a shade slightly off this Blue towards the color Violet (i.e. Blue-Violet). Never the less, Newton saw that the mathematical relationships of these six known colors, including his new color, were similar to those of the natural notes in music. He consequently assigned the acronym “ROYGBIV” to these seven colors, as he split the rainbow seven ways intentionally to mirror the seven notes of a musical scale; although he suspected that the delineation between each was perhaps somewhat undefined, as further scientific proof was needed:

Intervals

Notes

Color

M7th to Octave

B to C

Violet

M6th to M7th

A to B

Indigo (really Blue-Violet)

P5th to M6th

G to A

Blue (really Green-Blue)

P4th to P5th

F to G

Green

M3rd to P4th

E to F

Yellow

M2nd to M3rd

D to E

Orange

Tonic to M2nd

C to D

Red

Diez

In 1723, David Gottlob Diez produced a system of corresponding musical notes to colors, along with other things such as planets; just as the Greeks had done 2000 years prior:

Note

Color

G#

Water-Blue & White

G

Blue

F

Various Colors

E

Green

D

Yellow

C

Red

B

Gray

A

Black

Castel

In 1734, the French Jesuit monk, mathematician and physicist, Louis Bertrand Castel, was a firm believer of there being a direct relationship between the seven “supposed” colors of the spectrum and the seven natural notes in music.   In 1763, he published his general theory of color-music in Esprits Saillies et Singularites du Pere. Castel was the first person to propose the construction of a “Light Organ” (Clavecin Oculaire), a new musical instrument which would simultaneously produce both the sound and his associated color for each musical note:

Note

Color

B

Dark Violet

A#

Agate

A

Violet

G#

Crimson

G

Red

F#

Orange

F

Golden Yellow

E

Yellow

D#

Olive Green

D

Green

C#

Pale Green

C

Blue

Mizler

In 1739, Lorenz Christoph Mizler developed his scheme for colored musical notes, in response to Newton’s theoretical work:

Note

Color

B

Violet

A

Indigo (really Blue-Violet)

G

Blue (really Green-Blue)

F

Green

E

Yellow

D

Orange

C

Red

Krüger

Johann Gottlob Krüger, in 1743, slightly altered Newton's musical tone to color correlation scheme, producing the following variation:

Note

Color

B

Violet

A

Purple

G

Sky Blue

F

Green

E

Sulfur Yellow

D

Golden Yellow

C

Red

Euler

Around 1760, the mathematician Leonhard Euler developed a system of correspondences between musical notes and colors:

Note

Color

B

Violet

A

Blue

G

Green

F

Yellow

E

Orange

D

Red

C

Purple

Lefébure

In the year 1789, Louis François Henri Lefébure modified Castel's scheme of colored musical notes, changing it to the following:

Note

Color

B

Violet

A

Orange

G

Yellow

F

Indigo (really Blue-Violet)

E

Red

D

Green

C

Blue (really Green-Blue)

Field

In 1817, George Field published an essay entitled Chromatics, or, an essay on the analogy and harmony of colours, where he presented his own musical note to color associations:

Note

Color

B

Dark Green

A

Green

G

Yellow

F

Orange

E

Red

D

Violet

C

Blue

Fourier

In 1846, Charles Fourier wrote in his Theorie de l'Unite Universelle, that the connection between colors and musical notes was based on the following:

Note

Color

B

Red

A

Orange

G

Yellow

F

Green

E

Azure

D

Indigo (really Blue-Violet)

C

Violet

Sudre

In 1862, François Sudre’s death occurred, however he left behind him the invention of “Solresol”, a universal language based upon the seven musical pitches (do, re, mi, fa, sol, la, si - with "middle C" set as "do”). Sudre suggested the system for encoding Solresol could use lanterns using the following color sequence:

Solresol

Note

Color

si

B

Violet

la

A

Indigo (really Blue-Violet)

sol

G

Blue (really Green-Blue)

fa

F

Green

mi

E

Yellow

re

D

Orange

do

C

Red


Seemann

In 1881, the German painter, T. Seemann, devised a concept of pictorial coloring based on colored musical notes. Notice the enharmonic coloring (EC) of the half notes
C#, F# and G#:

Note

Color

B

Black

A#

Rose

A

Violet

G#

Blue-Violet (EC of Blue & Violet)

G

Blue

F#

Green-Blue (EC of Green & Blue)

F

Green

E

Yellow

D#

Gold

D

Orange

C#

Red-Orange (EC of Red & Orange)

C

Red


Rimington

Around 1890, Alexander Wallace Rimington began building his color-organ in England with the following note to color correspondences:

Note

Color

B

Violet

A#

Blue

A

Purple

G#

Light Green

G

Green

F#

Dark Green

F

Olive Green

E

Yellow

D#

Light Orange

D

Dark Orange

C#

Rose

C

Dark Red

Bishop

In 1893, Bainbridge Bishop, an American composer, published an article entitled A souvenir of the color organ, with some suggestions in regard to the soul of the rainbow and the harmony of light with marginal notes and illuminations, regarding his system of correspondences for colored notes, which he showed as being correct with respect to the natural color of rainbows. By this time, Bishop had already constructed at least three color organs capable of playing sound and displaying its corresponding light together or separately as seen in the following correlations. Notice the enharmonic coloring (EC) of the half notes
C# and D#:

Note

Color

B

Violet-Red

A#

Violet

A

Blue-Violet

G#

Blue

G

Green-Blue

F#

Green

F

Yellow-Green

E

Yellow

D#

Orange-Yellow (EC of Orange & Yellow)

D

Orange

C#

Red-Orange (EC of Red & Orange)

C

Red

Kandinsky

Around 1895, the famous artist Wassily Kandinsky, considered how the characteristic timbre of musical instruments might relate to colors:
Yellow was like “an ever louder trumpet blast or a fanfare elevated to a high pitch”, Orange was like “a church bell of medium pitch ringing the angelus, or like a rich contralto voice, or a viola playing largo”, Red was like “fanfares with contributions from the tuba - a persistent, intrusive, powerful tone”, Vermilion was “sounds like the tuba and parallels...with powerful drumbeats”, Purple was like “high, clear, singing tones of the violin...successive tones of little bells (including horse bells)...called 'raspberry-colored sounds' in Russian”, Violet was like a “cor anglais or shawm, and in its depths the deep tones of the woodwind instruments (for example, bassoon)”, Blue was like “a flute” clear and cool, Dark Blue was like “the cello, and going deeper, the wonderful sonority of the contrabass; in its deep solemn form, the sound of blue is comparable to the bass organ” and Green was like “quiet, drawn-out, meditative tones of the violin”.

Blavatsky

Around the year 1900, Helena P. Blavatsky, founder of The Theosophical Society, published two works called Isis Unveiled and The Secret Doctrine. Her own musical tone to color correspondence was as follows:

Note

Color

Si

Violet

La

Indigo (really Blue-Violet)

Sol

Black

Fa

Green

Mi

Yellow

Re

Orange

Do

Red

Berlioz, Debussy & Wagner

Around the year 1905, the three famous composers, Hector Berlioz, Claude Debussy and Richard Wagner, who were all contemporaries of eachother, were also interested in the connection between music and color. They were all members of the Rosicrucian Order, which based its musical theories of “just intonation” on the following sound frequencies and colors as they correlated to musical notes. Notice the enharmonic coloring (EC) of the half note
F#:

Sound Frequency

Note

Color

 

F#

Violet-Red (EC of F & G)

341Hz

F

Violet

320Hz

E

Blue-Violet

 

D#

Blue

288Hz

D

Green-Blue

 

C#

Green

256Hz

C

Yellow-Green

240Hz

B

Yellow

 

A#

Orange

213Hz

A

Red-Orange

 

G#

Red

192Hz

G

Dark Red

Rimsky-Korsakov

Based on an article in 1908 with the Russian press, the famous composer Rimsky-Korsakov had synesthetically colored the “Circle of Fifths” musical keys in the following way:

Note

Color

C#

Dusky (the same as Db)

F#

Greyish-Green (the same as Gb)

B

Dark Blue (the same as Cb)

E

Sapphire Blue

A

Pink

D

Yellow

G

Brownish-Gold

C

White

F

Green

Bb

Darkish

Eb

Greyish-Blue

Ab

Greyish-Violet

Db

Dusky (the same as C#)

Gb

Greyish-Green (the same as F#)

Cb

Dark Blue (the same as B)

Helmholtz

In 1910, Herman von Helmholtz transposed musical frequencies in order to mathematically find direct scientific relationships between musical notes and visual colors using the “Law of Octaves”. For example, one can take the concert pitch A at 440 Hz. and get another audible A at 880 Hz. exactly one octave above. If one were to mathematically double that octave thirty-nine more times, the frequency of the original pitch
A would be 483,785,116,221,440 Hz., a visual light frequency seen in the natural color spectrum as Red. Notice the enharmonic coloring (EC) of the half notes A#, C# and D# in the following rough estimates:

Sound Frequency

Note

Color

Light Frequency

784 Hertz (Hz)

G

Ultraviolet

784X10*12thHz

740 Hertz (Hz)

F#

Violet

740X10*12thHz

698 Hertz (Hz)

F

Blue-Violet

698X10*12thHz

659 Hertz (Hz)

E

Blue

659X10*12thHz

622 Hertz (Hz)

D# (EC of D & E)

Green-Blue

622X10*12thHz

587 Hertz (Hz)

D

Green

587X10*12thHz

554 Hertz (Hz)

C# (EC of C & D)

Yellow-Green

554X10*12thHz

523 Hertz (Hz)

C

Yellow

523X10*12thHz

493 Hertz (Hz)

B

Orange

493X10*12thHz

466 Hertz (Hz)

A# (EC of A & B)

Red-Orange

466X10*12thHz

440 Hertz (Hz)

A

Red

440X10*12thHz

415 Hertz (Hz)

G#

Dark-Red

415X10*12thHz

392 Hertz (Hz)

G

Infrared

392X10*12thHz

Beach

Around 1910, the American pianist and composer, Amy Beach, had a synesthetic color coding system for the following musical keys: C-White,
F Sharp-Black, E-Yellow, G-Red, A-Green, A Flat-Blue, D Flat-Violet and E Flat-Pink.

Scriabin

The Russian composer, Alexander Scriabin, was highly influenced by the French and Russian salon fashions and he seems to have been strongly influenced by the theosophical ideas of Madame Blavatsky.  The synesthetic motifs found in Scriabin's compositions like Prometheus, composed in 1911, are developed off of color coding ideas from Newton. These ideas follow a basic mathematical musical algorithm called the “Circle of Fifths”, which corresponded to his concept of the following colors, as he modulated from one musical key to another:

Note

Color

C#

Violet (same as Db)

F#

Bright Blue (same as Gb)

B

Blue (same as Cb)

E

Sky Blue

A

Green

D

Yellow

G

Orange

C

Red

F

Dark Red

Bb

Rose

Eb

Steel

Ab

Purple

Db

Violet (same as C#)

Gb

Bright Blue (same as F#)

Cb

Blue (same as B)

De Maistre

In 1919, Roy De Maistre, a young Australian musician turned painter, showed how specific musical notes corresponded to different hues to form a colored musical note code. Notice the enharmonic coloring (EC) of all the five half notes (i.e.
A#, C#, D#, F# and G#):

Note

Color

G#

Violet-Red (EC of Violet & Red)

G

Violet

F#

Indigo-Violet (EC of Indigo & Violet)

F

Indigo (really Blue-Violet)

E

Blue

D#

Green-Blue (EC of Green & Blue)

D

Green

C#

Yellow-Green (EC of Yellow & Green)

C

Yellow

B

Orange

A#

Red-Orange (EC of Red & Orange)

A

Red

Theremin

In the year 1922, Leon Theremin invented the "Illumovox" to accompany his "Etherphone" (the instrument now known as a Theremin). When connected to the Etherphone, the Illumovox projected an evolution of hues of the natural color spectrum in direct correspondence to the pitch changes on the Theremin instrument. These correspondences were straightforward, with the lowest pitches as almost
Infrared to Red and then with successively higher pitches moving through the colors Orange, Yellow, Green, Blue and Violet, up to the highest pitches bordering on Ultraviolet.

Klein

In the early 20th century, the British non-figurationist painter, Adrian B. Klein, realized the possibilities of light and became a leading specialist in music kinetic art. In 1926 he published his Colour Music: The Art of Light, where he presented his note to color correlations:

Note

Color

B

Dark Violet

A#

Violet

A

Light Violet

G#

Blue

G

Light Blue

F#

Dark Green

F

Green

E

Yellow

D#

Orange

D

Dark Orange

C#

Red

C

Dark Red

Appeli

Around 1940, Appeli had related musical notes to colors:

Note

Color

B

Purple

A#

Violet

A

Blue

G

Green-Blue

F

Green

E

Yellow

D

Orange

C

Red

Heaney

In 1942 a music teacher named Gertrude M. Heaney created an educational apparatus for teaching music through the use of color and consequently was granted a U.S. patent for her invention. It consisted of a practice piano pad, that was colored, and also an instruction manual. As with Bishop’s and Maistre’s system, notice the enharmonic coloring (EC) of the half notes
C#, D#, F# and G#:

Note

Color

B

Yellow

A#

Pink or (EC of Orange & Yellow)

A

Orange

G#

Red & Orange (EC of Red & Orange)

G

Red

F#

Green & Red (EC of Green & Red)

F

Green

E

Purple

D#

Blue & Purple (EC of Blue & Purple)

D

Blue

C#

Brown & Blue (EC of Brown & Blue)

C

Brown

Vyshnegradsky

The composer Ivan Vyshnegradsky is most famous for his ground breaking work with alternate tuning systems and compositions using quarter tones during the early 20th century. Around 1970, he disclosed his own correlation of musical notes to colors shortly before his death nine years later. Notice the enharmonic coloring (EC) of the half note
C#:

Note

Color

B

Red

A#

Light Violet

A

Violet

G#

Blue

G

Light Blue

F#

Dark Green

F

Green

E

Yellow

D#

Gold

D

Orange

C#

Red-Orange (EC of Red & Orange)

C

Red

Wiley

In 1991, Michael John Wiley publicly displayed colored stickers on his classical guitar’s fret board. He used the six simple named colors in English (
Red, Orange, Yellow, Green, Blue, and Violet). He did not include Indigo in his list of colors as it was purely an historic artifact, it was too close in shade to the colors Blue and Violet for practical application on musical instruments and it was not part of the hexagonal theoretical models of the six natural colors. Rather, he used White (Gray when displayed on white backgrounds) as the center (C) and resolution of all the other notes. His color assignment was closely resembling that of Euler’s, though like De Maistre and Heaney, he extended the idea of “enharmonic spelling” to the five half notes, using color; what Wiley termed “enharmonic coloring”. Notice the enharmonic coloring (EC) of the five half notes C#, D#, F#, G# and A#. As with the prior existence of several other similar color coded musical systems, these ideas were really nothing new at all:

Note

Color

B

Violet

A#

Blue & Violet (EC of Blue & Violet)

A

Blue

G#

Green & Blue (EC of Green & Blue)

G

Green

F#

Yellow & Green (EC of Yellow & Green)

F

Yellow

E

Orange

D#

Red & Orange (EC of Red & Orange)

D

Red

C#

White & Red (EC of White & Red)

C

White

De Clario

In 1995, and Australian named Dominic De Clario gave a scientific and spiritual presentation on the aspects of light and sound where he assigned colors to the white keys of a piano. All of the colors in his presentation were coordinated to the particular keys of the music, as well as the particular notes being played. De Clario wanted to have White light as part of the color selection and he arbitrarily chose to add it on the note B, as he saw it as the sum of all of the visible colors preceding it; somewhat similar to what Wiley had done four years prior:

Note

Color

B

White

A

Violet

G

Blue

F

Green

E

Yellow

D

Orange

C

Red

This brings us to the end of our MUSICAL COLORS family tree timeline.

The idea of using color to represent musical whole tones in tandem with the idea of combining these same colors to represent the musical half tones between them is practically as old as the science of music itself. Whether these half note color combinations are represented as actual mixtures of two colors (i.e. one resulting mixed color), or whether these half notes are represented by two separate colors (i.e. not mixed into one color but never the less shown in tandem with one another), does not really matter, for the two colors chosen are still present in referencing half notes. Therefore, the theory behind such an idea remains consistent.

The randomness of assigning colors to notes demonstrates how these
MUSIC/COLOR schemes are arbitrary to somewhat scientific at best. It is fairly easy to coordinate seven colors to seven notes and a scientific relationship is not necessarily established just because there can be equal numbers of each. The concept of tone to color calibration has been, for the most part, an arbitrary but necessary starting point for these systems. Like many other people throughout the world, here at MUSICAL COLORS we understand these systems and we participate by bringing this ancient knowledge to full application potential. After all, the knowledge has always been there in some form or another.

However, the one specific and fairly recent example that validates these principals quite poignantly is the U.S. Patent No. 2,284,868, which clearly states that "...seven elements representing the natural notes of an octave in the musical scale are preferably colored...” (and remember this is an arbitrary selection of colors); while the “...five elements representing the half notes of the octave are preferably colored as a mixture of the colors applied to the natural note-representing elements at opposite sides thereof...", also being arbitrary, although enharmonically theoretical in nature based on previous musical knowledge. This patent was granted on June 2nd, 1942 to Gertrude M. Heaney, an elementary school teacher, and it provides that this knowledge is now and forever legally in the public domain.

Even though there are many current systems and methods for teaching music, for the most part, music theory, music composition and musical instrumental appreciation have been taught the old fashion way; as cerebral and physical disciplines in scholarly institutions. Within the elusive past though, there is still much more to be rediscovered, just as now there is something showing us the future.

Join the MUSICAL COLORS family.

B e c o m e your
own
T e a c h e r


Copyright © 1991-2005 by Michael John Wiley
All Rights Reserved

Home

Kids

Who

What

When

Where

How

Why

Links

Contact